FINRA Arbitration Claim Filed Against Success Trade Securities for Ponzi Scheme Related Claims

The Law Offices of Aaron Resnick, P.A. along with the law firm Erez & Sonn, PA announced that it is filing a FINRA arbitration claim against Success Trade Securities, Inc. (“Success Trade”) located in Washington D.C.. The claim involves sales by Success Trade of promissory notes to primarily professional athletes and the misuse of funds. According to Yahoo Sports, this appears to be a Ponzi scheme which has victimized investors, including some of the Firms’ clients.

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/not-for-attribution/federal-investigators-looking-alleged-18-million-investment-scam-212514480.html

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/not-for-attribution/feds-nfl-nba-players-ensnared-18-million-investment-181232863.html

According to Rand Getlin’s Article multiple NFL and NBA players were ensnared in this $18 million dollar investment scheme.

Here is part of the article:

“Financial regulators overseen by the U.S. government have ordered an investment firm with prominent NFL and NBA clients to halt fundraising after allegedly selling $18 million in fraudulent and unregistered promissory notes.

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) has accused Success Trade Securities and its owner, Fuad Ahmed, of lying about key facts surrounding investments secured by 58 clients. FINRA did not release the names of the athletes ensnared in the scam, however, an 18-month investigation by Yahoo! Sports determined that a large portion of those involved were players represented by Jade Private Wealth Management.

While Jade’s client list has fluctuated, the investment firm boasted more than 70 NFL players at one point, including among others, Cleveland Browns cornerback Joe Haden, New York Giants wideout Victor Cruz, San Francisco 49ers tight end Vernon Davis, as well as former stars such as running back Clinton Portis and defensive end Adewale Ogunleye.”

FINRA’s Complaint alleges that Ahmed and Success Trade misrepresented that they were raising $5 million through the sale of promissory notes and continued to make this representation, even as the sales exceeded the original offering by more than 300 percent. Most of the notes promised to pay an annual interest rate of 12.5 percent on a monthly basis over three years, with some notes promising to pay interest as high as 26 percent.